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Monday, August 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Understanding commanders" information needs for influence operations found in the catalog.

Understanding commanders" information needs for influence operations

Understanding commanders" information needs for influence operations

  • 212 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by RAND in Santa Monica, CA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Generals -- United States -- Information services,
  • Command of troops,
  • Influence (Psychology),
  • Information warfare -- United States,
  • Combined operations (Military science),
  • United States -- Armed Forces -- Officers -- Information services,
  • United States -- Armed Forces -- Information services,
  • United States -- Armed Forces -- Planning,
  • United States -- Military policy

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementEric V. Larson ... [et al.].
    ContributionsLarson, Eric V. 1957-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsUB413 .U434 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23861701M
    ISBN 109780833046918
    LC Control Number2009042183

    mission success. Combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan resulted in the use of non-doctrinal story boards in the planning process. This practice lacks the fidelity necessary to provide the commander with decisionmaking information he needs, and can lead to a loss of synchronization during operations. A commander's critical information requirement (CCIR) directly influences decisionmaking and facilitates the successful execution of military operations. Commanders decide to designate an information requirement as a CCIR based on likely decisions and their visualization of the course of the operation. A CCIR may support one or more decisions.

    framework for the exercise of mission command. Army doctrine publica-tion (ADP) , Mission Command, and ADP , The Operations Process, describes the latest evolutions of these concepts. This article provides a brief history of mission command in the U.S. Army, summarizes the main ideas. Commanders are the most important participants in the operations process. While staffs perform essential functions that amplify the effectiveness of operations, commanders drive the operations process through understanding, visualizing, describing, directing, leading, and assessing Size: KB.

    The commander's information needs, coupled with an understanding of METT-TC, influence force tailoring and the deployment sequence. ISR assets deploy to the theater ahead of or with initial-entry forces, depending on enemy. operations. Commanders are the most important participants in the operations process. While staffs perform essential functions that amply the effectiveness of operations, commanders drive the operations process through understanding, visualizing, describing, directing, leading, and assessing operations.


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Understanding commanders" information needs for influence operations Download PDF EPUB FB2

Understanding Commanders' Information Needs for Influence Operations (Rand Corporation Monograph) 0th Edition by Eric V. Larson (Author), Forrest E. Morgan (Contributor), Brian Nichiporuk (Contributor), Richard E.

Darilek (Contributor), Dalia Dassa Kaye (Contributor) & 2 moreCited by: 3. Understanding Commanders' Information Needs for Influence Operations.

Book Description: Documents a study whose goals were to develop an understanding of commanders' information requirements for cultural and other "soft" factors in order to improve the effectiveness of combined arms operations, and to develop practical ways for commanders to integrate information and influence operations.

Read this book on Questia. Documents a study whose goals were to develop an understanding of commanders' information requirements for cultural and other soft factors in order to improve the effectiveness of combined arms operations, and to develop practical ways for commanders to integrate information and influence operations activities into combined arms planning/assessment in order to.

Additionally, Army education and training should train future commanders in the principles of employing influence operations across a wider range of mission types, and should seek to promulgate best practices from the field for better integration of influence operations into combined arms Size: KB.

Each mode is indicative of a different communication relationship between a commander and his staff, and each places a different demand on the command-and-control operating system.

To fulfill commanders' information needs, the authors recommend a number of education and training measures: institutionalize back briefing, teach process as well as procedures, and train unit command Cited by: Understanding commanders’ information needs for influence operations / Eric V.

Larson [et al.]. Includes bibliographical references. ISBN (pbk.: alk. paper) 1. United States—Armed Forces—Officers—Information services. Generals—United States—Information services.

Command of troops. Influence (Psychology) 5. Documents a study whose goals were to develop an understanding of commanders' information requirements for cultural and other "soft" factors in order to improve the effectiveness of combined arms operations, and to develop practical ways for commanders to integrate information and influence operations activities into combined arms planning/assessment in order to increase the usefulness to ground commanders of such operations.

The monograph describes commanders' own views of their information needs for information and influence operations, identifies principal sources of commanders' information needs for these operations, and sets out important challenges associated with improving the ability of field commanders to plan, execute, and assess successful information and influence by: 3.

Get this from a library. Understanding commanders' information needs. [James P Kahan; D Robert Worley; Cathleen Stasz; Arroyo Center.] -- Based on observations of Army Group, corps, and division command posts in action over 12 different exercises and on interviews with a variety of military experts (including doctrine writers and.

xiv Understanding Commanders’ Information Needs for Influence Operations rupt or usurp adversarial human and automated decision making while protecting our own. The term influence operations can generally be understood as synony-mous with strategic communication (STRATCOMM), which is defined in Joint Publication asCited by: 3.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Commanders' Information Needs for Influence Operations Commanders' most critical information need is to understand the attitudes, beliefs, and mood of the local civilian Success in influence operations depends on commanders' understanding of the battle space and of how to employ influence Many Author: Kristin J Leuschner.

Commanders’ needs for information generally flow from an interaction of factors within three principal arenas: commanders’ guidance regarding the overall mission, the resources available to the commander, and the operating environment. In terms of commanders’ guidance, influence operations planning should flow from the top down while.

Commander's Handbook for SC and Communication Strategy (Ver. ) strategy. The information herein also can help the joint community develop SC doctrine, mature emerging SC concepts for possible transition into joint doctrine, and further SC effectiveness in joint operations.

Commanders should consider the potential benefits. publication as a guide for instructing deep operations. Commanders, staffs, and subordinates ensure that their decisions and actions comply with applicable United This understanding assists commanders in visualizing the physical arrangement of forces in time is that area of concern to the commander including the area of influence, areas File Size: 1MB.

D E P A O TM ENT FT H E A R M Y • • E U N I T E D S TAT S O A F AM E R I C R T HISWE'LL DE FE ND Joint Publication Joint Operations 17 January Incorporating Change 1 22 October Situational understanding supports commander's visualization.

Information management, including priorities commanders set by establishing and continuously updating their commander.

Commanders are the most important participants in the operations process. While staffs perform essential functions that amplify the effectiveness of operations, commanders drive the operations process through understanding, visualizing, describing, directing, leading, and assessing operations File Size: 7MB.

commander's critical information requirements (ccir): reality versus perception 6. author(s) major michael r. barefield 7. performing organization name(s) and adoress(es) 8. performing organization school of advanced military studies report number attn: atzl-swv fort leavenworth, kansas (comm) () avn Cited by: 2.

To appreciate how ADM helps commanders and staffs understand, visualize, and describe operations, leaders must first understand the nature of operations. Military operations are human endeavors. Understanding command and control / David S.

Alberts, Richard E. Hayes. p. cm. -- (Future of command and control) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 1. Command and control systems. I. Hayes, Richard E., II. Title. III. Series. Cover and illustrations by Joseph Lewis UBA 'dcUSMC FINANCIAL GUIDEBOOK FOR COMMANDERS.

APR 3 ii NAVMC LOCATOR SHEET Operations and Maintenance, Marine Corps (O&MMC) 5 Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps Reserve (O&MMCR) 5 In order for HQMC to answer budget questions, Commander’s need to articulate what the.Information operations are essential to winning the information war on the future battlefield, and IEW is the key to successful information operations.

information operations enable, enhance, and protect the commander's decision making cycle while influencing an opponents.